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Sunday, October 31, 2010

Course Title: Social Movement and Protest Politics in India

Programme: BA (Political Science)
No. of Credits: 4
Course designers:

1. Sabu Thomas-(group Leader) savempeny@gmail.com
2. Mr. Biju P R bijugayu@gmail.com
3. Mr. Biveesh U C biveeshuc@gmail.com
4. Ms. Gayathri O bijugayu@gmail.com

Vision of the College

The vision of the college is to create a better world through ideal citizens. In order to realize the vision, the college aims to impart an education par excellence for the all-round development of the students who enter its portals. They are trained to express themselves in love, compassion, creative action and self - discipline.

Mission of the College

The mission of the College is to help prepare outstanding educators, scholars, and researchers. As a college we are committed to research, teaching and extension that make an important difference in the lives of our stakeholders in the locality, the nation and the world by:

• Providing a world-class education for our students
• Encouraging lifelong learning through extension education
• Advancing a productive and sustainable civic culture
• Promoting a wise stewardship of the environment
• Supporting a safe, secure activism
• Facilitating individual and community health and well-being
• Pursuing scholarship that addresses social issues

Programme Educational Objectives: Graduates of BA(Political Science) programme will be able to

1. Demonstrate an understanding of politics and government around the world and of political ideas, public policy and public law.
2. Undertake research in social science
3. Develop citizenship skills and to participate in public life
4. Develop an appreciation of positions contrary to their own political viewpoints and an understanding of human life beyond their own community
Intended Programme Outcome
1. Analyze and participate in the formulation and implementation of public policy at the local, state, federal, and international level by building consensus and using effective lobbying techniques.
2. Participate in and/or influence government at all levels through an understanding of the establishment, structure, and interaction of such governmental institutions.
3. Use effective writing, research, analysis, advocacy, and coalition-building skills to develop and influence policy at the national and international levels.
4. Conduct, analyze, and evaluate theoretical and empirical research for specific problems to affect domestic and international policy by applying political theory, systems, and processes in organizational environments.
5. Apply knowledge of ethical principles and issues to public policy and politics.

Course Curriculum for B.A. Programme

Working days/Semester -90 days
Credit for Common courses -38 credits
Credit for Core courses -62 credits
Credit for Complimentary courses -16 credits
Credit for Open courses -04 credits
Total Credit for the Programme -120 credits

Course Overview

Protest politics and social movements have become almost permanent features of the contemporary political landscape. In contexts where there is little hope for institutional redress, activists often stage protests to open up democratic avenues for affecting political influence. At the same time, even in democratic states, social movements and protest are common. Movements represent not only grievances on a particular set of issues, but also frustration with more established political forms of making claims in advanced industrialized societies. Those employing social movements for political goals include people who want to increase democracy, and others who want to limit it. When actors on different sides of political issues employ the same social movement forms and tactics to advance their causes, we are witnessing a growth in public distrust of more institutional democratic politics. To the extent that social movement politics have become increasingly routinized and institutionalized element of contemporary politics, they reflect a permanent skepticism about more conventional democratic procedures. Protest outside institutions is closely linked to the politics inside institutions.
This course provides a more political understanding of 'civil society' by examining social movements in relation to civil society and public sphere. For the last few decades, mainstream discourse has adopted the notion of 'civil society' and public sphere as simultaneously the site of 'citizens' collective action'. It begins by current theories of ‘civil society' ‘public sphere’ and 'new social movements'. It then assesses the impact of nationalist movements on shaping the development agenda of nineteenth-century colonial India and how social movements from the 1950s onwards interacted with national governments in blocking, changing or advancing the development agendas.
It offers a detailed analysis of the ideological framework of the social and political movements and familiarizes the conceptual theories and typologies. Focus is laid on the study of case studies of Dalit movements, Environmental and Ecological Movements, Working Class Movement, Agrarian Movements, Religious and Communal Movements, Regional Movements, Women’s Movements, Ethnic Movements with Special Reference to Tribals, Backward Class Movement, Dalit Movement, etc.
Competencies: At the end of the course the students should be able to
1. Demonstrate an understanding of meaning, theories, and operations of social movements in modern India
2. Apply basic principles of political theory to the field of collective behavior/social movements
3. Design models of protest politics in order to solve local issues at community levels
4. Develop critical perspectives of the prevailing social order
5. Understand the relationship between protest movements and democracy
6. Create websites, blogs, join online communities to organize activism online
7. Understand the operation of advocacy groups for the protection of social justice

Instructional Objectives

C1: Demonstrate an understanding of meaning, theories, and operations of social movements in modern India
C1G1: Define social movements (Remembering)
C1G1S1: define social movements
TI1: What is social movements ?
TI2: List out different types of social movements ?

C1G1S2: Mention the nature of social movements in India
TI1: List out the characteristics of social movements in India.
TI2: Describe the histoy of social movements in modern India.
C1G2: Explain the theories of social movements ? (understanding)
C1G2S1: Explain various theories of social movements
TI1: describe various theories of social movements ?
C1G3:Estimate the role and impact of social movements in India (apply)
C1G3S1:estimate the impact of social movements in modern India ?
TI1:Elaborate the influence of social movements in making modern India ?
Ti2:determine the role of nationalist leadership in igniting social movements ?
C1G4:Distinguish between old and new social movements (analyse)
C1G4S1:differentiate between traditional and modern theories of social movements
TI1:outline the traditional theories of social movements ?
TI1:characteristics of modern theories of modern theories of social movements ?
C1G5:make a critique of new social movements in India (evaluate)
C1G5S1:significane of new social movements
TI1:justify the usefulness of new social movements in India ?
C1G6:apply different theories of social movements to selected social problems (Create)
C1G6S1:construct theoretical alternatives to contemporary social movements
TI1:make a Gandhian perspective to maoist insurgency in India ?
TI2:examine the Plachimada issue ,Kerala, in the context of marxian perspective.


C2:Apply basic principles of political theory to the field of collective behavior/social movements
C2G1. Social movement theory (Remembering)
C1G1S1.theories of collective behaviour
TI1:mention theory of relative deprivation
C2G2.rational choice(understanding)
C2G2S1 the benefits of rational individuals if they join in collective action
TI1 why people are rational actors even in choosing a collective course of action ?
C2G3 resource mobilization(apply)
C2G3S1:social movements and organization
TI1 why resource mobilization theory in social movements observe that organization is relevant
C2G4:Collective action in Alberto Melucci(analyse)
C2G4S1:Melucci and theory of code
TI1:how did melucci theorise collective action ?
C2G5:social movement theories and social problems (evaluate)
C2G5S1:applicability os theories in understanding social problems
TI1:what extent different theories are useful to understand collective behavior ?
C2G6:social movenents in India(Create)
C2G6S1:nature of social movements in India
TI1:identify the applicabilty of theories of social movement to understand various protest movements in the Indian context ?


C3-Design models of protest politics in order to solve local issues at community levels
C3G1-Protest politics among the local community(Remembering)
C3G1S1-road expansion and displacement
TI1-discuss the express highway highway development programme ?
C3G2- how the express highway development impacts society (understanding)
C3G2S1-express highway and society
TI1-why there is much hue and cry over express high way ?
C3G3-express highway and right to life -(apply)
C3G3S1-estimate the express highway development in your locality
TI1-how do you respond if there is a proposed express highway action plan ?
C3G4-express highway and rehabilitation (analyse)
C3G4S1-protest against proposed rehabilitation
TI1-how to organise a citizen activism against rehabilitation package ?
C3G5-citizen initiative for policy responses (evaluate)
C3G5S1-reasonableness of citizen activism in the context of express highway
TI1-do you think that citizen protesting against road development is just ?
C3G6-alternative citizen initiative for express highway development programmes (Create)
C3G6S1-importance of alternative plans for express highway
TI1-how to do away with express highway when there is need for road development ?

C4-Develop critical perspectives of the prevailing social order
C4G1-Enumerate different perspectives of social order (Remember)
C4GIS1 -Define different perspectives associated with prevailing social order
TI1-Define traditional, Liberal and modern perspectives of social order
TI2-What are the different levels of structures in the current social order?
C4G1S2-Describe different features of various social order
TI1-Enumerate different locations of various social order
TI2-List the qualities of changing perspectives of the various prevailing social order
C4G2 -Express the features of prevailing social Order(Understand)
C4G2S1-Explain the features of different types of social order in different societies
TI1-Explain with examples the difference between traditional and modern social order
TI2-Compare and contrast the arguments inside the left perspectives of social order
C4G2S2-Distinguish the structure of different social order
TI1-Give an example of liberal perspectives of social order
TI2-Explain why there are contradictions inside Marxian perspectives of social order
C4G3-Determine the need for concrete perspectives of social order. (Apply)
C4G3S1-Determine the various tools necessary for pragmatic social order
TI1-Draw various solutions to bring consensus in an anarchic society.
TI2-What are the tools you suggest to polish a crude social order?
C4G3S2-Estimate the data required for pragmatic social order
TI1-carry out different steps necessary for a practical social order
TI2-Calculate the depth of values laiden in a modern social order
C4G4-Identify the tools necessary for pragmatic social order(Analyse)
C4G4S1-Select the operational data requirements for a democratic social order
TI1-Identify the operational tools required for a Gandhian model of democracy.
TI2-What personal informations would be demanded by the state from its citizens for effective democracy.
C4G4S2-Compare the constitutions of two or more social order
TI1-Identify the problems faced by a social order with unwritten constitutions.
C4G5-Justify the use of unified Identify cards in a diverse society like India (evaluate).
C4G5S1-Evaluate the use of unified Identify cards and work out how it affect the marginalized sector of the social order
TI1-Justify evaluate the use of unified Identify cards and workout how it affect the marginalised sector of the social order
TI2-Evaluate the advantages of UIDs to the earlier system.
C4G5S2-Evaluate the significance of new social order
TI1-Justify the usefulness of various social orders in a society.
C4G6-Design a different perspective to the prevailing social order in India (Create)
C4G6S1-Construct theoretical perspective to the prevailing social order
TI1-Plan a left perspective to the current challenges of development in India.


C5 - Understand the relationship between Protest Movements and Democracy
C5G1: Define Democracy (Remembering)
C5G1S1: Define democracy
TI1: What is Democracy ?
TI2: What are different Types of Democracy?
C5G1S2: Mention the nature of Indian Democracy
TI1: List out the futures of Indian Democracy.
TI2: Describe the development of democracy in Independent India.
C5G2: Explain the relevance of Protest Movements in Democracy? (Understanding)
C5G2S1: Explain the concept of deliberative Democracy
TI1: Describe various channels of deliberation?
TI2: Explain the role of Political parties in democracy?
C5G2S2 : Explain Political Participation
TI1: Bring out various methods of participation?
TI2 Describe theories of political participation?
C5G3: Estimate the role of protest movements in Indian democracy (apply)
C5G3S1: Estimate the impact of protest movements in democracy
TI1: Discuss the role of protest movements in promoting democratic process?
TI2: Assess the contribution of protest movements during emergency, in smoothening the operation of democracy in national polity?
C5G3S2: Evaluate recent trends in protest movements
TI1: Evaluvate the impact of terrorism in Indian Democracy?
TI2: Discuss the civil society response to Maoist movements in India?
C5G4:Distinguish between old and new concepts of Democracy (Analyse)
C5G4S1: Differentiate between traditional and modern concepts of Democracy
TI1: Outline the traditional theories of democracy ?
TI2: Examine the characteristics of modern theories of democracy
C5G5: make a critique of protest movements in Indian Democracy (evaluate)
C5G5S1:Evaluvate the significance of protest movements in democracy
TI1:Evaluvate the role of protest movements in India ?
C5G6:plan an alternative model of protest in a democratic way ?
C5G6S1-non-party political domain in democracy
TI1-how to plan a non-party domain in democracy which formulate a protest space?

C-6: Understand the operation of advocacy groups for the protection of social justice
C6G1: Define Adovacacy Groups and Social Justice (Remembering)
C6G1S1: Define advocacy Groups
TI1: What are advocacy groups?
TI2: Name important advocacy groups in India ?
C6G1S2: Define social justice
TI1:Describe the characteristics of justice?
TI2: List out the provisions in Indian constitution to ensure social justice?
C6G2: Explain the theories of social justice ? (Understanding)
C6G2S1: Explain various theories of social justice
TI1: describe various theories of social justice ?
C6G3:Estimate the role advocacy groups in maintaining social justice (apply)
C6G3S1:Estimate the impact of advocacy groups in modern India ?
TI1:Determine the role of NGO’s in the protection of social justice in India ?
Ti2:Estimate the contributions of advocacy groups in civil society movements ?
C6G4:Distinguish between old and new social movements (analyse)
C1G4S1:differentiate between traditional and modern theories of social movements
TI1:outline the traditional theories of social movements ?
TI1:characteristics of modern theories of modern theories of social movements ?
C1G5:make a critique of new social movements in India (evaluate)
C1G5S1:significane of new social movements
TI1:justify the usefulness of new social movements in India ?
C6G6:apply different theories of social movements to selected social problems (Apply)
C1G6S1: construct theoretical alternatives to contemporary social movements
TI1: make a Gandhian perspective to maoist insurgency in India ?
TI2: examine the Plachimada issue, Kerala, in the context of marxian perspective.

Course Module

Module I a) Social Movements: Meaning, Nature and Importance

b) Marxian, Liberal and Gandhian
c) Classification of Social Movements Including New Social Movements

Reading List

1. Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Second Edition, 1998.
2. Rajiv Bhargava and Ashok Acharya,Political Theory:An Introduction,New Delhi:Pearson Education,2008,pp.188-204
3. Vandana Shiva, Ecology and Politics of Survival: Conflicts and Natural Resources in India, New Delhi: SAGE, 1991,
4. Rajeev Bhargava and Helmut Reifeld,Civil Society,Public Sphere and Citizenship:Dialogue and Perceptions,New Delhi:Sage,2005
5. Dwaipayan Bhattacharya and et.al,Interrogating Social Capital:The Indian Experience, New Delhi:Sage,2004
6. Sudipta Kaviraj and Sunil Khilnani,Civil Society;History and Possibilities,New Delhi:Cambridge University Press,2001

Module II Social and political movements in India-A historical overview
Reading List

1. Rajiv Bhargava and Ashok Acharya,Political Theory:An Introduction,New Delhi:Pearson Education,2008,pp.188-204
2. Sumi Krishna, , Environmental Politics, New Delhi: SAGE Publications, 1996
3. Leif Ohlsson,(Ed.)Hydro Politics: Conflicts over Water as a Development Constraint,Dhaka: The University Press Limited. 1996
4. Vandana Shiva, Ecology and Politics of Survival: Conflicts and Natural Resources in India, New Delhi: SAGE, 1991,
5. Dwaipayan Bhattacharya and et.al,Interrogating Social Capital:The Indian Experience, New Delhi:Sage,2004
6. Frances Fox Piven and Richard A. Cloward. Poor People's Movements. New York: Vintage, 1977
7. Rajni Kothari, Democratic Polity & Social Change in India, Delhi, allied, 1976.
8. S. Kothari, Social Movements and Redefinition of Democracy, Boulder Colorado, Westview Press, 1990.

Module III Discourses on social and political movements

a)Social Movements and Democracy: An Assessment
b)State and Social Movements
c)Globalisation and Social Movements

Reading List

1. Frances Fox Piven and Richard A. Cloward. Poor People's Movements. New York: Vintage, 1977
2. Rajni Kothari, Democratic Polity & Social Change in India, Delhi, allied, 1976.
3. S. Kothari, Social Movements and Redefinition of Democracy, Boulder Colorado, Westview Press, 1990.
4. T. K. Oomer, 'Protest and Change, Studies in Social Movement', New Delhi, Sage , 1990
5. K. Jones, 'Socio -Religious Reform Movement in British India, Cambridge
6. N. Subramaniam, Ethnicity & Populist Mobilization:Politial Parties, Citizens, Democracy in South asia, Delhi, Oxford Uni. Press, 1999.
7. Valerie Jenness and Kendal Broad. Hate Crimes: New Social Movements and the Politics of Violence, New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 1997


Module IV Social and political movements in India

Environmental and Ecological Movements,Working Class Movement,Agrarian Movements,Religious and Communal Movements,Regional Movements,Women’s Movements,Ethnic Movements with Special Reference to Tribals,Backward Class Movement,Dalit Movemen

Reading List

1. Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Second Edition, 1998.
2. Raka Ray, Fields of Protest: Women’s Movements in India. Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 1999.
3. Rajiv Bhargava and Ashok Acharya,Political Theory:An Introduction,New Delhi:Pearson Education,2008,pp.188-204
4. Sumi Krishna, , Environmental Politics, New Delhi: SAGE Publications, 1996
5. Leif Ohlsson,(Ed.)Hydro Politics: Conflicts over Water as a Development Constraint,Dhaka: The University Press Limited. 1996
6. Vandana Shiva, Ecology and Politics of Survival: Conflicts and Natural Resources in India, New Delhi: SAGE, 1991,
7. Frances Fox Piven and Richard A. Cloward. Poor People's Movements. New York: Vintage, 1977
8. Rajni Kothari, Democratic Polity & Social Change in India, Delhi, allied, 1976.
9. S. Kothari, Social Movements and Redefinition of Democracy, Boulder Colorado, Westview Press, 1990.
10. T. K. Oomer, 'Protest and Change, Studies in Social Movement', New Delhi, Sage , 1990
11. K. Jones, 'Socio -Religious Reform Movement in British India, Cambridge
12. N. Subramaniam, Ethnicity & Populist Mobilization:Politial Parties, Citizens, Democracy in South asia, Delhi, Oxford Uni. Press, 1999.
13. Valerie Jenness and Kendal Broad. Hate Crimes: New Social Movements and the Politics of Violence, New York: Aldine de Gruyter, 1997

Course transactions; proposed activities

1. Apply the macro-level theories of civil society,public sphere and socio-political movements from the class room activities to micro-level problems identified in the panchayath and native place and make an assignment report.
2. Assign each student in the class to identify the forms of protest politics in local areas and organize an exhibition of such reports in the college and invite students of the college and public to watch it.
3. Organize a seminar programme , inviting activist and participants of protest politics in the local areas and have an interaction with such people who are victims of flawed development in such areas.
4. Assign each student create blogs and social networks in cyber space and organize polls and discussion forums to spread ideas and ideologies of protest politics in local areas, nationally and globally.












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